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Musical road route 66 new mexico

Two years ago, the New Mexico Department of Transportation decided to spice up a particularly desolate stretch of Route 66 between Albuquerque and Tijeras by adding grooves in the road that will play music when you drive over them. If you drive the speed limit of 45 mph for the quarter-mile stretch, you can hear "America the Beautiful" play through the vibrations in your car's wheels. The grooves in the road work just like the rumble strips or "drunk bumps" that vibrate your car when you start to drift out of your lane. But these rumble strips are precisely positioned to create different pitches when you drive over them. The result? The notes to "America the Beautiful" rising from the bottom of your car. The engineering behind the road is pretty simple. As Matt Kennicott explains to Smithsonian , anything that vibrates times per second will produce an E note. This applies to violin strings and car tires alike. So all you need to do to produce an E note is make sure that the car hits strips in one second at 45 mph, a scenario that works out to each rumble strip being placed 2.
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Log in to get trip updates and message other travelers. Singing Road Reviews. Scenic Drives. Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date s you selected. Please choose a different date. Would you send a friend who is visiting for the first time to this place or activity? Yes No Unsure. Is this a place or activity you would suggest for families with kids? Are the prices for this place or activity budget-friendly? Is it free to enter this place?
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In fact, most of the iconic signs were officially removed from highways in In , National Geographic funded the installation of custom metal plates over a small eastbound stretch of Interstate 40 the modern-day replacement for Route 66 between Albuquerque and Tijeras. The patriotic anthem can be heard when drivers maintain a speed of 45 miles per hour over the plates embedded into the rumble strips. New Mexico state officials hoped the road would help drivers maintain their focus and cut down on distractions. If the driver goes too fast or too slow the music will stop; so total focus is required to hear the tune. And if nothing else, at least it will entertain you as you drive through the desert! This video from National Geographic shows how the musical highway was constructed. Watch the clip below to hear the singing road! Want to find the exact location of this road to try it yourself? Are you planning to visit Albuquerque for more than a day?

In fact, most of the iconic signs were officially removed from highways in In , National Geographic funded the installation of custom metal plates over a small eastbound stretch of Interstate 40 the modern-day replacement for Route 66 between Albuquerque and Tijeras. The patriotic anthem can be heard when drivers maintain a speed of 45 miles per hour over the plates embedded into the rumble strips.

New Mexico state officials hoped the road would help drivers maintain their focus and cut down on distractions. If the driver goes too fast or too slow the music will stop; so total focus is required to hear the tune. And if nothing else, at least it will entertain you as you drive through the desert! This video from National Geographic shows how the musical highway was constructed. Watch the clip below to hear the singing road! Want to find the exact location of this road to try it yourself?

Are you planning to visit Albuquerque for more than a day? We visited the singing highway during our visit to Albuquerque in It was kind of tricky to keep the wheels lined up along the grooves—and you really do have to watch your speed to hear the song—but we finally made it work with a little help from cruise control. We eventually did three passes over the singing highway grooves before we successfully played the full song. Check out our video below to see one of our attempts and be sure to try the singing road on your next visit to Albuquerque!

New Mexico is one of our favorite states to visit! Here are a few places to consider for your next vacation. Sign up for our monthly email with our latest posts and more! Thank you for subscribing! Please check your email to confirm. Something went wrong. Please try again. Unsubscribe any time, we hate SPAM! Learn more about our Newsletter. Search for:. The Musical Highway in New Mexico In , National Geographic funded the installation of custom metal plates over a small eastbound stretch of Interstate 40 the modern-day replacement for Route 66 between Albuquerque and Tijeras.

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